2022 Conference Sessions

Dates and times subject to change

Sunday, October 9 | 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

  1. It's Everybody's Business: Taking a Public Health Approach to College Mental Health (An Elements of Excellence Program)
  2. Vulnerable Leadership Session 1: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly - Soliciting and then publicly reviewing staff feedback about you -- as the director -- back to your staff
  3. Meaning in the chaos: Using data to inform & advocate
  4. Uniting Through Connection: How to Bring Diverse College Orgs. Together to Promote Mental Wellness and DEI Initiatives
  5. Navigating Tough Transitions: Applying Adaptive Leadership and Diversity Leadership Principles through Staff Transitions and Continuous Change
  6. Building a Culturally Diverse and Inclusive College Counseling Center
  7. Who are the People in Your Neighborhood? | An A to Z of the Campus Partners we couldn't live without

Monday, October 10 | 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Tuesday, October 11 | 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

  1. Supplementing Traditional Counseling Center Models with External Vendor Contracts and/or TeleHealth Services (An Elements of Excellence Program)
  2. Understanding the IACS Standards and the Benefits of IACS Accreditation in Collegiate Mental
  3. Leading & Healing: How to Manage Microagression and other Ruptures Within Your Team
  4. When Expectations Collide: Balancing the Ideal Worker Norm and Today's Counseling Center Staff
  5. To Accommodate or Not to Accommodate, That is the Question: Supporting professors through an increasing presence of mental health requests in their classrooms
  6. Remember when it was easier to recruit/retain staff?! (Strategies to survive/thrive during a national staffing shortage)

Tuesday, October 11 | 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

  1. Finding Our Joy: How to make our work sustainable and meaningful in difficult times (An Elements of Excellence Program)
  2. BIPOC Directors swimming in Hostile Waters: Decolonizing Professionalism; Strategies for managing centers in times of struggle and staff hostilities
  3. Strategies for Embedding Staff Self-Care into the Policies, Practices and Operations of Your Counseling Center
  4. "What If This Is The End?": Wisdom from Hard Conversations
  5. Animals on Campus: Ethical and Practical Considerations
  6. Emeritus ProgramThe challenges of change that kept us up at night: Reflections on the ethical and practical issues faced in the past that are relevant for today.

Wednesday, October 12 | 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

  1. Reimagining Counseling Center Work: Driven by Equity and United in Connection (An Elements of Excellence Program)
  2. Supporting Collegiate Recovery Initiatives
  3. Mission Possible: Responding to the College Mental Health Crisis by Supporting the Academic Mission
  4. Is this our "New Normal"? Finding our footing in a changing world

Wednesday, October 12 | 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

  1. What's Going on Around Here?": Applying a Developmental Perspective to the Mental Health Crisis in Higher Education
  2. Lasso Lessons: Using Humor in the Treatment of Trauma and the Facilitation of Post-traumatic Growth
  3. The Doctor is In -- or virtual, part time, contracted, or just plain hard to find -- Exploring Various Psychiatric Models in College Counseling

It's Everybody's Business: Taking a Public Health Approach to College Mental Health (An Elements of Excellence Program)

Instructional Level: Introductory

As the demand for mental health care has grown in volume and severity, university counseling centers may feel forced to limit preventive work in order to prioritize clinical work. Yet prevention should also be viewed as an important means of mitigating demand. It represents a key component of the Comprehensive Counseling Center model (Brunner et al., 2017), the socio-ecological model (Bronfenbrenner, 1989), and the Jed Foundation Comprehensive Approach (Jed Foundation, 2018), and it plays a crucial role in changing the culture of college mental health. By taking a public health approach, we can invite and support partners from across campus to participate in this goal. This session will describe the ways in which partners such as faculty, students/peers, and other Student Affairs departments are promoting mental health on various campuses. Specific examples will be provided and discussed, including advantages, disadvantages and tips for successful partnerships.

Presenter(s):

  • Dianna Abel, Weber State University (25,001 - 30,000)
  • Calvin Chin, Princeton University (7,500 - 10,000)
  • Karen Hofmann, University of Central Florida (45,001+)
  • Andrew Miller, Sam Houston State University (20,001 - 25,000)

Topic(s):

  • Outreach Programming / Prevention

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will understand the role of prevention in the scope of college/university counseling center work.
  • Participants will learn how a public health approach can broaden responsibility for college mental health.
  • Participants will learn about several examples of mental health prevention programs sponsored by campus partners outside the counseling center.

Vulnerable Leadership Session 1: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly - Soliciting and then publicly reviewing staff feedback about you -- as the director -- back to your staff

Instructional Level: Introductory

Our jobs are becoming increasingly difficult as pressure and criticism build from all directions. It's natural for us to want to retreat to our offices and slide the "survival mode" sign across our door. We've all been there, relying on email and avoiding certain topics, policies, and staff. However, there's another way out - to become even more vulnerable to the very staff who may be applying some of the pressure.   This session will share how one director has voluntarily solicited personally-focused constructive feedback with great trepidation, fear, and second-guessing in two different formats at two different institutions "“ one large (50k+ students; ~65 staff) and one medium (8K+ students; ~10 staff) - and then publicly presented the raw feedback back to staff "“ the good, the bad, and the ugly "“ with a commitment to change.  Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to publicly and humbly confront your growth edges and blind spots to those you serve. High risk, high reward. Is it worth it?

Presenter(s):

  • Mark Patishnock, Michigan State University (45,001+)

Topic(s):

  • Staff Retention and Development

Learning Objective(s):

  • Identify and apply two unique models of soliciting and presenting feedback from their staff
  • Design a specific survey/process to use with your staff.
  • Increase confidence and ability to demonstrate vulnerable leadership in your work setting as a means to enhance working relationships and improve center culture.

Meaning in the chaos: Using data to inform & advocate

Instructional Level: Introductory

Data is important to "˜tell our story'. The "˜telling' is the final step in a process that begins with knowing what data to gather. This workshop will discuss the many steps included in an effective data-plan. We will first discuss the many types of data available to Directors and then discuss how to collect, analyze and present data to constituents. Furthermore, we will highlight how to use broad data sets, such as the AUCCCD Annual Survey and the CCMH Annual Report, as a useful tool for Directors.

Presenter(s):

  • Kimberly Gorman, Western Carolina University (10,001 - 15,000)
  • David Walden, Hamilton College (1,501 - 2,500)
  • Lynn Braun, Defiance College (Under 1,500)

Topic(s): 

  • Annual Survey / Data

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will identify sources of data available to them within their centers.
  • Participants will discuss how they can use their data with at least two of their constituent groups.
  • Participants will understand how to use the AUCCCD Director Survey data with their constituent groups.

Uniting Through Connection: How to Bring Diverse College Orgs. Together to Promote Mental Wellness and DEI Initiatives

Instructional Level: Intermediate

During Fall semester 2022, the Counseling Center will launch a pilot program meant to bring diverse college organizations together in the effort to promote mental wellness and diversity, inclusion, and equity initiatives. The hope is that this will both boost our community intervention attendance, unite different student organizations across campus (i.e. ethnic student organizations, academic organizations, political organizations, theater and art majors, Greek life), and increase the diversity of students seeking mental health services at the Counseling Center.

Presenter(s):

  • Anthony Rivera, Ohio Northern University (2,501 - 5,000)

Topic(s):

  • Diversity, Equity & Inclusive Excellence
  • Outreach Programming / Prevention
  • Self-care

Learning Objective(s):

  • Improve student engagement through mental health awareness education, decreasing stigma, and increasing help seeking behaviors.
  • Connect different student organizations with a common initiative.
  • Advance a climate that fosters inclusion excellence.

Navigating Tough Transitions: Applying Adaptive Leadership and Diversity Leadership Principles through Staff Transitions and Continuous Change

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Presenters will briefly describe Diversity Leadership (Chin & Trimble) and Adaptive Leadership (Heifetz, Linsky, & Grashow) frameworks, using examples from difficult transitions as Counseling Center Directors. Through the lens of these leadership models and their lived experiences, presenters will discuss navigating awkward staff and role changes, unexpected organizational change, and overwhelming university demands. Presenters will discuss how their identities and the identities of staff members impacted leadership challenges and successes. Participants will be invited to share their own lessons learned, consider how identity impacts their leadership, and to apply the leadership frameworks discussed. Limits of the models will also be described. Participants will come away with ideas for enhancing their own leadership effectiveness in difficult times.

Presenter(s):

  • Brittany Sommers, Cleveland State University (15,001 - 20,000)
  • Katharine Hahn Oh, John Caroll (2,501 - 5,000)

Topic(s):

  • Diversity, Equity & Inclusive Excellence
  • Staff Retention and Development

Learning Objective(s):

  • Critique Diversity Leadership and Adaptive Leadership models
  • Describe lessons learned from leading through change
  • Apply principles from Diversity Leadership or Adaptive Leadership to current challenges

Building a Culturally Diverse and Inclusive College Counseling Center

Instructional Level: Intermediate

This experiential workshop will focus on building a culturally diverse and inclusive college counseling center that's centered on cultural humility and equitable practices.  Facilitators will guide participants on creating a diversity plan for their center that includes establishing annual goals and implementing recruitment and retention strategies for diverse staff members and trainees.  Moreover, Facilitators will discuss ways to develop a multicultural care team that provides administrative, clinical, and outreach consultation to the center and campus community.  Additionally, this workshop will focus on responding to racial/bias incidents on campus and establishing brave spaces to engage in dialogue.  Lastly, this workshop will explore assessing cultural humility and offering a multicultural counseling specialization for trainees.

Presenter(s):

  • Ahmed Ghuman, University of Pittsburgh (30,001 - 35,000)

Presentation and interactive activity to begin designing a diversity plan utilizing a multicultural counseling toolkit that was developed by our counseling center through an APPIC grant.

Topic(s):

  • Diversity, Equity & Inclusive Excellence
  • Social Justice / Advocacy

Learning Objective(s):

  • Demonstrate how to design a diversity plan that includes developing goals and recruitment and retention strategies for diverse staff members and trainees.
  • Explain how to develop a multicultural care team that provides administrative, clinical, and outreach consultation to the center and campus community.
  • Discuss how to respond to a racial/bias incident on campus while establishing brave spaces for community members to engage in meaningful dialogue.

Who are the People in Your Neighborhood? | An A to Z of the Campus Partners we couldn't live without.

Instructional Level: Introductory

From Sesame Street to University Avenue, we come to acquaint ourselves with a cast of characters throughout our careers as Directors. Some relationships are superficial, fleeting, and maybe even bothersome, while others "“ well, we shudder to think of doing the job without them! Come join fellow directors in a discussion of the campus partners whom we could not live without and talk about lessons learned in fostering and maintaining professional relationships in our campus communities. Brought to you by the letter A (for Attorney, of course).

Presenter(s):

  • Deanna Nobleza, Thomas Jefferson University (7,500 - 10,000)
  • Meghan O'Meara, Thomas Jefferson University, East Falls Campus (7,500 - 10,000)
  • Marcus Hotaling, Union College (1,501 - 2,500)
  • Nivla Fitzpatrick, Pepperdine University (7,500 - 10,000)

Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Outreach Programming / Prevention

Learning Objective(s):

  • By the end of the program, participants will be able to identify multiple offices to partner with in ways they may previously not have identified.
  • Participants will be able to identify and apply tactics to use when partnering with campus constituencies.

Get Back to Basics:  Re-Grounding through Counseling Center Infrastructure (An Elements of Excellence Program)

Instructional Level: Intermediate

More and more, counseling centers are urged to "get creative" and "be innovative" in order to make ends meet and serve our campuses.  Maybe we can put less energy into scrambling and re-inventing, and turn to re-grounding through the basics.  This session will focus on core components of center foundation and infrastructure, with primary attention on personnel, center identity, and director well-being.  We will challenge the idea that "we can't hire our way out of this", and present varying models of structuring clinical, non-clinical, and support staff positions and compensation, with the goal of promoting mobility, longevity, and disciplinary diversity and equity.  We will explore the use of assessment tools and data to help identify the gaps between "what our centers are" and "what our centers are trying to be", along with service shifts and communication strategies that can bring about better alignment.  Presenters will discuss experiences of what has worked well and where pitfalls can arise amidst any changes.  The unique pressures on the director as a mid-level manager within the infrastructure of the center and institution will also be examined, and we will share some personal practices for handling those pressures and fostering director wellness.

Presenter(s):

  • Erin Vlach, Columbus College of Art and Design (Under 1,500)
  • Ernesto Escoto, University of Florida (45,001+)
  • Andrew Lee, Temple University (35,001 - 45,000)
  • Melissa Rotkiewicz, Universiity of Massachusetts Amherst (30,001 - 35,000)

Topic(s):

Learning Objective(s):

  • Describe various models of staff composition, personnel structure, and potential advantages and pitfalls of implementing changes.
  • Examine the applicability of tools like data, surveys, and the Center for Collegiate Mental Health's Clinical Load Index (CLI) in defining center scope and identity.
  • Identify the systemic pressures influencing the experience of the director as a mid-level manager, and practices for handling these pressures.

From Imposter to Impactful Leader: Advocating Systemic Changes in Support of BIPOC Staff Development

The broader aim of this presentation is to help counseling center directors come up with strategies to help create a supportive environment for BIPOC staff who can then go on and own their power. BIPOC staff are often faced with unique barriers that cause them to doubt their capabilities and contributions in predominantly white spaces, leading to an increase in imposter syndrome. Our presentation will highlight and raise awareness around the individual and systemic factors that contribute to these challenges faced by BIPOC staff. We also aim to provide suggestions to leaders on how to support BIPOC staff in the larger effort of shifting agency culture towards greater inclusivity and empowerment of BIPOC staff. 

Presenters: 

  • Denisha Champion, Wake Forest University (7,501 - 10,000)
  • Jennifer Moulton, University of Wisconsin Madison (45,001+)
  • Meghana Suchak, University of Louisville (20,001 - 25,000)
  • Qianhui Zhang, Northwestern University (20,001 - 25,000)

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will be able to name 3 systemic and individual challenges faced by BIPOC staff.
  2. Participants will be able to identify 3 strategies that they can implement that they can use to support and retain BIPOC staff. 
  3. Participants will gain ideas to shift agency culture in real vs. performative ways.

Vulnerable Leadership Session 2: "Tic-Toc-Doc" on the clock - Living and directing with the stigmatizing and often misunderstood condition of Tourette Syndrome (TS)

Instructional Level: Introductory

Since 8-years of age, I have lived with full-blown TS. As a psychologist, I am trained to treat it.   Many of us have an invisible disability, aspect of diversity, and/or concealable stigma. It is unspeakably powerful when we as leaders choose to make the invisible visible, the concealable known, and sublimate a stigma into a tool. It releases the weight over our insecurities and has the capacity to shift the culture through constructive modeling.   Attendees will receive a succinct overview of TS and tic disorders through in-person demonstration and summary information that dispels myths and allows for easy understanding and diagnosis. Through a powerful experiential activity, participants will be invited (but not required) to experience the physical sensations associated with tics that provide temporary relief to manage this misunderstood and often stigmatized condition. That's right, although a symptom, tics are temporarily helpful.    This session is designed as a second "vulnerable leadership session" at this conference to provide opportunities to lean into discomfort in public and known ways. Attendees will be encouraged to identify their own areas of invisible disability, diversity, and/or concealable stigma in powerful and meaningful ways as leaders.

Presenter(s):

  • Mark Patishnock, Michigan State University (45,001+)

Topic(s):

  • Diversity, Equity & Inclusive Excellence

Learning Objective(s):

  • Correctly diagnose Tourette Syndrome and other tic disorders including accurately identifying and explaining both simple and complex tic symptoms across motor and vocal categories.
  • Experience the physical sensations associated with tics as a means of better explaining and identifying with those who have Tourette Syndrome.
  • Personally identify an area of invisible disability, diversity, and/or concealable stigma and ways to demonstrate its usefulness in promoting vulnerability and open dialogue as a director in a position of power and influence.

Highlights from the 2020-2021 AUCCCD Directors' Survey

Instructional Level: Introductory

For over fifteen years the Association for University and College Counseling Center Directors has been tracking collegiate mental health policy and practice trends to assist counseling center directors with benchmarking data in key operational areas to guide informed leadership. The survey's flexibility has led to informed collaborations with critical professional allies. 329 counseling center directors completed the 2021 AUCCCD director's survey, providing a wealth of information on utilization, staffing changes, counseling services, and utilization trends. The salary survey was sent separately to obtain information about director and staff demographics and salary information.  This workshop will present some of the highlights of the survey, including data about services offered, telehealth services, demand for services, staff morale and turnover, and salary disparities for Directors. The workshop will also discuss tips for gathering data for the 2021-2022 survey while also allowing for discussion regarding ways of enhancing the usefulness of the survey for Directors.

Presenter(s):

  • Kimberly Gorman, Western Carolina University (10,001 - 15,000)
  • Cindy Bruns, Central Washington University (7,500 - 10,000)
  • Karen Sokolowski, University at Albany, SUNY (15,001 - 20,000)
  • Nivla Fitzpatrick, Pepperdine University (7,500 - 10,000)

Topic(s):

  • Effects of COVID-19
  • Staff Retention and Development

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will analyze the current survey data highlights in order to be able to articulate this information to their campus constituents.
  • Participants will be discuss the data regarding salaries and other factors impacting staff turnover.
  • Participants will identify potential changes to the survey to enhance the usefulness of the survey to Directors.

IACS Site Visitor Training

Instructional Level: Introductory

This training is designed to present a comprehensive overview of the policies and procedures involved in conducting an IACS site visit. It is opened to individuals whose counseling centers are accredited by IACS and who desire to be trained as IACS site visitors. In addition, it is also recommended for current visitors who have not attended a previous training, and for those who would like to update their knowledge of the site visit process. Competencies to be reviewed include organizing the visit schedule, conducting interviews with various personnel, applying the IACS Standards to the review, responding to typical critical incidents that may occur, writing the report, developing appropriate recommendations, and accessing and uploading reports to the IACS drive.

Presenter(s):

  • Anika Fields, Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University (7,500 - 10,000)
  • Cynthia Cook, Universty of Houston-Clear Lake (7,500 - 10,000)

Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Ethics / Law
  • Other - Write In Training

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will identify the critical elements of a site visit and understand their place in the overall review process.
  • Participants will describe the organization of a typical onsite and virtual review including establishing the schedule, maintaining an appropriate role, investigating concerns identified by the application reviewers, conducting interviews with individuals
  • Participants will describe how the site visit fits into the overall review process; describe the organization of the site visit report, including relating the report to the IACS Standards; develop appropriate recommendations, and determine the overall rec

Why I Love Being a Director: Reclaiming the Meaning and Value of Leading a Counseling Center

Instructional Level: Intermediate

We hear a lot about "“ and live every day - the challenges of the Director role.  We also find meaning, connection, and joy in our work.  This session will share examples of the benefits of being a Director, what keeps us engaged and passionate about our work, and what we love about this job in a campus environment.   We'll also engage participants in considering their identities as Directors and the positive aspects of their roles.

Presenter(s):

  • Andrea Lawson, Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo (20,001 - 25,000)
  • Micky Sharma, The Ohio State University (45,001+)
  • Dennis Heitzmann, Penn State University (Emeritus)
  • Gary Glass, Oxford College of Emory University (Under 1,500)

Panel presentation with audience reflection and participation

Topic(s):

  • Self-care
  • Staff Retention and Development

Learning Objective(s):

  • Articulate at least three aspects of a Director role that can bring joy to one's life.
  • Identify a behavior or skill that could help Directors discover meaning in their work.

Supplementing Traditional Counseling Center Models with External Vendor Contracts and/or TeleHealth Services (An Elements of Excellence Program)

Instructional Level: Introductory

As the landscape of collegiate mental health shifts to increases in demand, fewer off campus referral options and unprecedented turnover, many centers have engaged outside vendors for the first time.  Additionally, state licensure restrictions and hybrid work environments forced many of us to rethink our service delivery models and offer telehealth services.  This session will explore the pros and cons of such new engagements.  Is telehealth here to stay? Are some students, particularly culturally diverse students, better served by expanding our options to include telehealth and contracted clinicians?  Where do we draw the line and what are the legal and ethical ramifications for clinicians?  Are there risks to our profession, as well, for supplementing this burgeoning field?

Presenter(s):

  • Vivian Barnette, NC A&T State University (10,001 - 15,000)
  • Karen Singleton, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (10,001 - 15,000)
  • ValaRay Irvin, Southern University (7,500 - 10,000)
  • Julie S. Ross, Tufts University (10,001 - 15,000)

Topic(s):

  • Mental Health Trends

Learning Objective(s):

  • Discuss the growing demand for TeleMental Health services Evaluate strengths and pitfalls of TeleMental Health services
  • Discuss ethical and legal concerns with TeleMental Health Clarify reasons that in-person sessions are better for some clients
  • Discuss best practices for TeleMental Health Services and the guidelines

Understanding the IACS Standards and the Benefits of IACS Accreditation in Collegiate Mental

Instructional Level: Introductory

Members of the International Accreditation of Counseling Services (IACS) leadership team will discuss the IACS Standards and how to incorporate the standards into creation of counseling center policies and procedures.  Whether a center is currently accredited or not, Clinical Directors are often in a leadership role in the implementation of practice.  Gaining a deeper understanding of the IACS Standards can help advocate for and implement these standards of practice.  The session will also describe the advantages and process of accreditation for those interested in obtaining accreditation for their university or college counseling centers, including its international growth. External peer reviews are seen as vital for accountability to demonstrate the high standards and quality of our services. IACS has long been dedicated to growing the visibility of college and university counseling centers through an evolving set of high professional standards, knowing that our success is driven in particular by higher education leadership knowing and engaging in these standards, thus addressing the fundamental value of accreditation. Our standards have recently been revised to reflect emerging trends in the field, including issues related to embedded staff, contracted services, peer review and teletherapy.

Presenter(s):

  • Paul Galvinhill, College of the Holy Cross (2,501 - 5,000)
  • William Burns, North Dakota State University (10,001 - 15,000)

Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will gain a deeper understanding of the IACS Standards and how centers can meet them.
  • Participants will discuss the advantages of having university and college counseling services accredited by IACS.
  • Participants will gain the tools to develop and present a strong argument for accreditation.

Leading & Healing: How to Manage Microagression and other Ruptures Within Your Team

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Just watch the news. It seems like bias incidents are happening everywhere and all the time. It is crucial to address these racist, sexist, or homophobic acts, but responding can be complicated. This workshop will offer guidance and practical, workable steps you and your team can implement right away. In particular, Directors will discuss how to negotiate their role and stimulus value when dealing with microaggressions or bias incidents. In addition, we will explore specific tools to heal ruptures, listen without being defensive, apologize unconditionally, and manage fears of saying or doing the wrong thing.

Presenter(s):

  • Stacey Pearson-Wharton, Susquehanna University (1,501 - 2,500)

Topic(s):

  • Diversity, Equity & Inclusive Excellence

Learning Objective(s):

  • Examine the insidious nature of bias and how it impacts most interactions, positively and negatively.
  • Enact specific strategies to heal ruptures created when well-intentioned people say and do problematic things.
  • Explore the impact of the social identity of the Director on  how a University Counseling Center manages bias incidents.

When Expectations Collide: Balancing the Ideal Worker Norm and Today's Counseling Center Staff.

Instructional Level: Intermediate

The challenges of being a counseling center director have continued to grow over time.   During the pandemic, generational differences in work/life balance expectations, as well as unique institutional culture, forced counseling center directors and other higher education administrators to rethink how they recruit and manage new employees.   With the advent of more mental health professionals leaving college counseling, recruiting and retaining a qualified and culturally diverse staff has also become more challenging.  Higher education is no longer seen as more desirable and less stressful than other work environments for many professionals.  As staff express their concerns and needs, directors must strive to balance the needs of staff with those of students and the institution.  This program will discuss challenges directors face in managing a center, with a specific focus on the additional hurdles that occurred during the COVID-19 pandemic.  Presenters will discuss specific challenges they encountered and strategies employed to best navigate them.  The concept of the ideal worker norm will be discussed.  The intersectionality of directors' identities and that of staff will also be discussed.  Time will be allotted for attendees to engage in small group dialogue, so as to mutually learn from each other.

Presenter(s):

  • Micky Sharma, The Ohio State University (45,001+)
  • Sharon Mitchell, University at Buffalo (30,001 - 35,000)
  • Carla McCowan, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (45,001+)
  • Jihad Aziz, Virginia Commonwealth University (20,001 - 25,000)

Topic(s):

  • Diversity, Equity & Inclusive Excellence
  • Effects of COVID-19
  • Staff Retention and Development

Learning Objective(s):

  • Define the ideal worker norm theory and explain its relevance to counseling center staff.
  • Describe how bringing awareness to generational differences in work expectations can support job satisfaction and employee retention
  • Discuss how the pandemic has impacted new employee adjustment to college counseling center settings and methods to improve the employee's integration into the workplace

To Accommodate or Not to Accommodate, That is the Question:  Supporting professors through an increasing presence of mental health requests in their classrooms

Instructional Level: Intermediate

With the post-pandemic increase in the frequency and acuity of student academic distress and a perceived concomitant decrease in effective coping mechanisms evidenced by students, faculty regularly encounter students who request academic accommodations due to reported psychological distress. Some of these accommodations are required by students' documented disability status, but most are independent decisions by faculty to extend some form of academic leniency (e.g., deadline extension, retaking an quiz or test, granting an incomplete) to a student. These are often challenging situations for faculty members because of the perceived conflict between two important values: student well-being and academic integrity. Additionally, faculty frequently report feeling unprepared to effectively manage the intensity of some students' distress and similarly unprepared to gauge the pedagogical implications of the decision whether to grant students' requests for accommodations. This workshop will provide participants an opportunity to learn, consider, and discuss the empathic experience of faculty facing these accommodation requests and the professional and personal boundary considerations that may be influential. Participants will also be provided with a provisional framework from which faculty members can work to develop a fair and compassionate response to students' accommodation requests.

Presenter(s):

  • David Onestak, James Madison University (20,001 - 25,000)
  • Erin Trujillo, Arizona State University (45,001+)

Topic(s):

  • Outreach Programming / Prevention
  • Consultation/Training

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will be able to describe the ways in which empathy may both inform and potentially compromise faculty members' decisions to grant academic accommodations.
  • Participants will be able to identify boundary issues for faculty which may be present in academic accommodation decisions.
  • Participants will be able to utilize a framework of questions to help faculty make fair and compassionate decisions about academic accommodations.

Remember when it was easier to recruit/retain staff?! (Strategies to survive/thrive during a national staffing shortage)

Instructional Level: Introductory

In recent years, counseling staff and directors have left their positions at alarming rates.  Many open positions and limited number of applicants have led to hiring delays and under-staffing, and added to existing staff workloads, burnout, and attrition.  Low salaries, high caseloads, and increasingly complex client conditions make recruiting and retaining experienced staff extremely challenging.  Made worse, the Office of Admissions and university leaders often present the counseling center as a comprehensive service while limiting staff position funding to support only acute crisis response, triage, brief therapy, and referrals.  In this presentation, three counseling directors will share historical data related to staff attrition, industry-specific job growth, and open positions.  Presenters will review different recruitment strategies, service models that match service scope with current staffing-levels, and systemic approaches to improve working conditions to increase staff retention.  Presenters will also discuss staffing advocacy tactics to consider using with senior university leaders.

Presenter(s):

  • Larry Long, University of Kansas Medical Center (2,501 - 5,000)
  • Marcus Hotaling, Union College (1,501 - 2,500)
  • Raime Thibodeaux, Louisiana State University (30,001 - 35,000)

Topic(s):

  • Staff Retention and Development

Learning Objective(s):

  • By the end of the program, participants will be able to identify and apply three recruitment strategies to use when hiring staff.
  • Participants will be able to describe two or more service models that match scope of service with current staffing-levels.
  • Participants will be able to identify factors that lead to lack of retention and apply three staff advocacy tactics to consider using with senior university leaders.

Finding Our Joy: How to make our work sustainable and meaningful in difficult times (An Elements of Excellence Program)

Instructional Level: Intermediate

The profession of collegiate mental health was once greatly sought after with promises of growth-oriented work, work-life integration, welcoming community, focus on prevention, and vibrancy. More recently, our profession appears to center around managing more acuity, increased institutional demands, and a changing client demographic where students are attempting to adapt to difficult societal norms.  While much has been discussed around the impact on college counseling staff members, an area that is not as explored is the impact on college counseling leaders. Directors often hold the same stress as staff therapists do with the added weight of personnel conflicts, decreasing budgets, and administrators who don't understand the work we do.  Addressing burnout in college mental health cannot be done without including directors in the conversation.    This presentation hopes to explore how we can hold on to the joy that drew us to the field while appreciating the reality of a changing landscape within college mental health. Concepts such as identifying signs of burnout, understanding healthy sublimation, sustainability of career choices, and re-discovering joy will be covered with a focus on group discussion and director support.

Presenter(s):

  • Anita Sahgal, University of South Florida, St. Petersburg (2,501 - 5,000)
  • Monroe Rayburn, The Catholic University of America (5,001 - 7,500)
  • Calvin R. Chin, Princeton University (7,500 - 10,000)
  • Karen Singleton, MMassachusetts Institute of Technology (10,001 - 15,000)

Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will identify common signs of burnout.
  • Participants will learn strategies around how to adapt to the changing landscape of college mental health.
  • Participants will explore how we can find our joy, leading either to a re-commitment to our work or discovering a new path.

BIPOC Directors swimming in Hostile Waters: Decolonizing Professionalism; Strategies for managing centers in times of struggle and staff hostilities

Instructional Level: Advanced

Over the last decade competing demands and the ever changing landscape of Collegiate Mental Health has been part of one of the many responsibilities faced by Directors of Counseling Centers.  However, in the past few years, the increased focus on efficiency, meeting clinical demand, attending to staff needs, changing expectations related to work-life balance, expectations regarding work responsibilities, stretched budgets, Employee & Labor relations pressures, and changing demographics has significantly shifted the experience of the Director.  Furthermore, calls for and resistance to social justice and the use of Racists and Gender Biased tropes used by some Staff and Administration all contribute to the turbulent waters..  So much so that managing a Counseling Center can feel like an impossible challenge.  This session will provide individual reflections of successful strategies employed to navigate these waters and discuss various tools and practices to overcome imposed doubt and recognize your strengths and resources as a leader. We will also explore how the lack of trust and inauthentic calls for transparency are used against BIPOC leaders.

Presenter(s):

  • Brian Olowude, University of California, Santa Barbara (25,001 - 30,000)
  • Frances Dias, UC Irvine (30,001 - 35,000)
  • Elizabeth Mondragon, UC Riverside (20,001 - 25,000)

Discussion and safe reflection will be a part of the overall presentation

Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Diversity, Equity & Inclusive Excellence
  • Self-care
  • Social Justice / Advocacy
  • Staff Retention and Development

Learning Objective(s):

  • Identify how the call for "professionalism" can and often does devalue the contributions of BIPOC leaders and early Career staff.
  • Identify Common racist tropes associated with professionalism and how they are used against BIPOC leaders.
  • Identify strategies to minimize the impact of and respond to Hostile Staff, and Administration and challenges that come with being a counseling center director.

Strategies for Embedding Staff Self-Care into the Policies, Practices and Operations of Your Counseling Center

Instructional Level: Intermediate

This session focuses on creating a culture in your department where "self care is not an invitation to take care of yourself, but an expectation." Presenters use the public health theoretical framework of the Socio-Ecological Model to develop a strategic plan for embedding self-care throughout the structure and operations of your counseling center.  The approach discussed aligns with the individual, relationship, community and society levels of the model.  Examples of strategies presented include how daily schedules are structured, peer support opportunities, boundary setting in responsibilities, supervision strategies, responding when staff are going through personal challenges and struggles, flexibility and autonomy, policies on personal counseling, expectations about vacation and unplanned absences, and ongoing training boosters about self-care and the prevention of burnout.  Additionally, challenges and barriers to creating such a culture and implementing strategies will be discussed.  Finally, the session will spend time talking about the essential nature of director self-care and the challenges and opportunities as leaders in our departments and on campus.

Presenter(s):

  • Angela Stowe, The University of Alabama at Birmingham (20,001 - 25,000)
  • Holly Harmon, University of Dayton (10,001 - 15,000)

Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Self-care
  • Staff Retention and Development

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will be able to utilize the socio-ecological framework to design a strategy that embeds self-care into the policies, procedures, and operations of their counseling center.
  • Participants will be able to identify barriers and challenges to creating a culture of self-care in their departments and implement strategies to address the challenges.

"What If This Is The End?": Wisdom from Hard Conversations

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Addressing performance issues and considering - or even pursuing! - termination is one of the hardest things we do as Directors. It is also a topic area for which we often have little mentoring or support. Just talking about performance issues, much less addressing them, thoughtfully and compassionately, through improvement plans or termination, can bring up anxiety and avoidance. Navigating these waters requires a set of core values, focus on the larger picture (for us, the Center, and the employee), and a view of the work that is more than mechanical. The presenters will share wisdom from hard conversations, provide space for processing the deep impact terminations can have on us and our systems, and how seeing Directing through a broadly "spiritual" lens can help sustain us through hard conversations.

Presenter(s):

  • David Walden, Hamilton College (1,501 - 2,500)
  • Ernesto Escoto, University of Florida (1,501 - 2,500)

Topic(s):

  • Staff Retention and Development

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will be able to describe their top three concerns related to performance evaluation or termination that get in the way of addressing performance issues with employees
  • Participants will be able to list three core values that could sustain them through difficult personnel issues
  • Participants will be able to apply a model of directing that is grounded in an organizational development lens to navigating hard conversations with employees, including termination conversations

Animals on Campus: Ethical and Practical Considerations

Instructional Level: Introductory

We are excited to announce the launch of the next HEMHA guide – Animals on Campus.  HEMHA is an interdisciplinary, collegial, and collaborative process of the Higher Education Mental Health Alliance (HEMHA), which includes representatives from 9 organizations that focus on higher education policy and university/college mental health that has resulted in several guides useful to practitioners and administrators alike.  We will discuss the purpose, scope and limitations of the guide, explain the differences between service, therapy, and emotional support animals and the legal rights of access for each one and, using the guide’s case vignettes as a launching point, review risks and legal and ethical issues associated with animals on campus, including accommodating and approving requests for Emotional Support Animals (ESAs).

Presenter(s):

  • Chris Corbett, University of Georgia (35,001 - 45,000)

Topic(s):

  • Animals on Campus

Learning Objective(s):

  • Discuss awareness of what the Higher Education Mental Health Alliance is and how to access their free resources;
  • Analyze practical and ethical dilemmas related to animals on campus;
  • Identify the differences between service animals, therapy animals, and emotional support animals and the current regulations related to each.

The challenges of change that kept us up at night: Reflections on the ethical and practical issues faced in the past that are relevant for today.

The nature of our work as directors almost guarantees a constantly changing landscape. The demands for service continue to escalate, crises are inevitable, and the challenges of hiring and retaining staff only grow worse. Let's face it, managing and responding to change is part of the job description. Four retired directors reflect on significant challenges, decisions, threats, and associated ethical challenges encountered during their tenure which might benefit sitting directors facing the demands of change today. Issues addressed will include the increase in pathology for our clients (including resource allocation and appropriate staffing), the model of service provision employed (comprehensive/developmental vs. clinical), the development of relationships with faculty/staff, managing administrative demands, coping mechanisms utilized, and the challenge of hiring, supervising, and maintaining staff. Our goal is to provide helpful insights and suggestions for directors facing the present-day challenges of change. This program will include lots of time for discussion and interaction.

Presenters:

  • Patti J. Fleck, PhD, Missouri University of Science and Technology (5,000+)
  • Steven Mueller, EdD, University of Dayton (10,000+)
  • Steve Sprinkle, PhD, University of San Diego (5,000+)
  • Wanda Collins, PhD, Emory University (15,000+)

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify two key factors contributing to important changes in university mental health.
  2. Identify two ethical implications related to changes in models of service provision over time.
  3. Identify two ethical dilemmas inherent in managing various relationships as a director.
  4. Identify and incorporate strategies and coping mechanisms for dealing with significant issues related to change/threat and process in the Center (experienced directors' lessons learned).

Supporting Collegiate Recovery Initiatives

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Although headlines about the opioid crisis, increased rates of cannabis use on college campuses, and purer forms of methamphetamine can be disheartening, the good news is that people recover from substance use disorders. In this session, presenters discuss collegiate recovery programs on their campuses, challenges they face, and innovative ways they have addressed these challenges. Additionally, a focus on collaboration with campus partners will be highlighted to demonstrate a continuum of care approach. Presenters will provide an overview of recovery-friendly language and will address stigma and other barriers to effective prevention, treatment, and recovery services.

Presenter(s):

  • Keilan Rickard, Emory University (15,001 - 20,000)
  • Jennifer Jones-Damis, Rutgers University (45,001+)
  • Jennifer Whitney, University of North Carolina at Greensboro (15,001 - 20,000)

Topic(s):

  • Diversity, Equity & Inclusive Excellence
  • Mental Health Trends
  • Outreach Programming / Prevention
  • Social Justice / Advocacy

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will increase their knowledge of substance use disorders and their impact on college students.
  • Participants will be able to articulate recovery-friendly messaging with regard to substance use disorders and recovery.
  • Attendees will demonstrate an understanding of the continuum of care and the role of mental health practitioners in the continuum.

Mission Possible:  Responding to the College Mental Health Crisis by Supporting the Academic Mission

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Many counseling centers still include "supporting the academic mission" in their mission statements, while struggling to keep up with demand for clinical appointments.  This program offers strategies to capitalize on the academic mission as a way to manage the narrative on your campus about mental health issues, toward reducing the burden of counseling centers to meet unsustainable demands of struggling students.  Steps toward building a bridge to academic affairs will be introduced, with examples of effective collaboration with academic affairs and faculty endeavors. Not simply proposing "more work for counseling centers," this program will illustrate how centers can increase their influence on campus and re-narrate the way mental health issues are narrated on campus, toward a strategy of reducing the burden on counseling centers to address unsustainable demands by struggling students. Introducing a Clinician/Educator framework, this presentation will review how to spark research projects, influence curriculum and pedagogy, incorporate academic elements into clinical data, and provide programming to faculty on the roles they can play to address themes common in counseling sessions.  We will explore how to identify collaborators and advocates for re-imagining not only college mental health but higher education, in general, incorporating social justice aims and strategies.

Presenter(s):

  • Gary Glass, Oxford College of Emory University (Under 1,500)

Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Mental Health Trends
  • Outreach Programming / Prevention
  • Social Justice / Advocacy
  • Other - Write In Academic Engagement

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will be able to generate at least 2 activities on their campus where counseling center collaboration supports the academic mission.
  • Participants will be able to list specific themes or issues on their campus where mental health and academic endeavors intersect.
  • Participants will identify academic elements for inclusion in counseling services and/or clinical data collected by the counseling center.

Is this our "New Normal"? Finding our footing in a changing world

Instructional Level: Intermediate

This program will focus on the evolution of counseling centers through the COVI-19 pandemic. Many centers were struggling with designing the best service delivery model prior to the pandemic, but the almost universal implementation of virtual services, the onslaught of vendors vying for our attention, and our campuses struggling with safely supporting our students have made it all more complicated. We will discuss the challenges and benefits of the common hybrid model that has emerged at many centers. In response to virtual services becoming a permanent option, many campuses are now offering or exploring the possibility of alternative work schedules, which may improve efforts to attract and retain staff. These shifts are complex and are also couched in changing campus environments that are increasingly touting well-being as a campus priority. And while increased attention to well-being is welcomed, it brings new constituents and perspectives into a conversation that has been mostly carried by counseling centers who may now be struggling to find their identity in this new landscape.

Presenter(s):

  • Josh Gunn, Kennesaw State University (35,001 - 45,000)
  • Chris Corbett, University of Georgia (35,001 - 45,000)

Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Effects of COVID-19
  • Outreach Programming / Prevention
  • Staff Retention and Development

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will be able to discuss the benefits and challenges of a hybrid service delivery system.
  • Participants will be able to analyze the increasing complexities of meeting changing staff expectations while also meeting the operational demands of the counseling center.
  • Participants will be able to identify opportunities for collaboration while maintaining identity within campus well-being efforts.

Reimagining Counseling Center Work: Driven by Equity and United in Connection (An Elements of Excellence Program)

Instructional Level: Introductory

Equity approaches to college counseling work can sometimes feel "added on" to our standard policies and practices.  When equity and inclusion become the core driver of our operations, however, we can reimagine our work and foster connectedness and belonging.  This presentation examines how Centers can approach service delivery, staff recruitment and retention, staff interactions and relationships, outreach and advocacy efforts, and work within the larger political and institutional environment ensuring that approaches, strategies, processes, and initiatives are rooted in an equity framework.  Panelists will review many different aspects of our work, such as clinical models, managing wait times for services, supporting students with marginalized identities, multicultural and anti-racist organizational development, managing microaggressions among staff, equity and inclusion initiatives in the wider university, and institutional support for Center diversity initiatives, all through the lens of equity and inclusion as a core value.  Discussion will focus on how directors and Centers can shift equity and inclusion from the margins of our work to the core of operations and procedures, and how this shift can improve our connection to our work, colleagues, and students.

Presenter(s):

  • Scott Strader, University of South Florida (35,001 - 45,000)
  • Anita Sahgal, University of South Florida - St. Petersburg (2,501 - 5,000)
  • Jeffrey Ng, Fordham University (15,001 - 20,000)
  • Melissa Rotkiewicz, University of Massachusetts - Amherst (30,001 - 35,000)

Topic(s):

  • Diversity, Equity & Inclusive Excellence

Learning Objective(s):

  • Participants will explore approaches to managing student needs within a framework of equity and inclusion.
  • Participants will examine models for multicultural and anti-racist organizational development and apply these principles to their centers.
  • Participants will identify how larger political, legal, and institutional climates support or undermine their center's equity initiatives.

What's Going on Around Here?": Applying a Developmental Perspective to the Mental Health Crisis in Higher Education

Instructional Level: Intermediate

In this breakout session, we explore the ongoing "mental health crisis" in college education at both an individual and systems level.  As our starting point, we describe and apply an existential-relational developmental perspective to the ways individuals and systems organize around experiencing differences and "otherness" as well as tolerating limits and disappointments. We discuss how symptoms emerge at either societal or individual level when either parents or institutes struggle with this process. This allows us to locate three intwined domains as being impacted by our institutes difficulties in holding complexities and so directly contributing to the ongoing "crisis"These are:

  1. A shift from value-based education towards promising "transformative experience.
  2. Ambivalence around recognizing the systematic and structural factors contributing to trauma, inequity, and suffering, including the COVID-19 pandemic.
  3. Faculty and administrators' anxiety about the use of "authority," especially when it entails establishing boundaries. Drawing again from developmental theory, we offer some ideas about how we in counseling centers can play a role in helpfully impacting the system to better embrace their ethical obligations around holding complexities and tolerating disappointments. 

Presenter(s):

  • Phllip Rosenbaum, Haverford College (Under 1,500)

Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Diversity, Equity & Inclusive Excellence
  • Effects of COVID-19
  • Mental Health Trends
  • Outreach Programming / Prevention
  • Trauma

Learning Objective(s):

  • Be able to describe developmental positions typical for adolescents and then to apply these to larger systems, including institutes of higher education.
  • Apply developmental positions both towards individual work but also towards systems. Accordingly, attendees will learn to identify the challenges commonly occurring within systems and be able to consider useful paths for consultation and if necessary intervention.

Lasso Lessons: Using Humor in the Treatment of Trauma and the Facilitation of Post-traumatic Growth

Instructional Level: Introductory

Humor is a natural stress reliever, and can be a key element in helping people heal from trauma. The popular TV show Ted Lasso uses humor to address a variety of life circumstances, and several of his "lessons" are now used in discussing leadership. They can also be applied in treating traumatic experiences and growing beyond them. This presentation will give a brief overview of the impact of trauma on the brain and development. It will also explore how humor, through a solution-focused lens, might effectively be used in working with survivors of trauma to help transform traumatic memories and gain meaning from their experiences.

Presenter(s):

  • Susan Sobel, University of Central Arkansas (10,001 - 15,000)

With group activity component in the latter part of the session.

Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Self-care
  • Trauma

Learning Objective(s):

  • Describe 2 ways that trauma impacts the brain and subsequent development.
  • Identify how humor relates to the treatment of trauma and post-traumatic growth.
  • Apply 1 of the "lessons" to a therapeutic situation to either work through trauma or promote post-traumatic growth.

The Doctor is In -- or virtual, part time, contracted, or just plain hard to find -- Exploring Various Psychiatric Models in College Counseling

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Does your center have difficulty managing student demand for psychiatry? Do you struggle to retain psychiatric support? Or, are you just not sure where to start with integrating psychiatry into your Center? In this session, we will explore various models of psychiatry in college counseling; introduce innovative approaches to manage psychiatric demand; and discuss lessons learned integrating psychiatry in our centers. This session will allow ample time for Q&A and discussion.

Presenter(s):

  • Deanna Nobleza, Thomas Jefferson University, Center City (7,500 - 10,000)
  • Bruce Herman, University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) (10,001 - 15,000)
  • Angela Stowe, University of Alabama at Birmingham (20,001 - 25,000)

Time will be dedicated for discussion and Q&A

Topic(s):

  • Counseling / Clinical Work
  • Effects of COVID-19
  • Staff Retention and Development

Learning Objective(s):

  • Describe different models of psychiatry utilized in college counseling centers and/or student health
  • Identify innovative approaches to manage psychiatric demand
  • Describe the role of psychiatry in short-term treatment (1 to 3 sessions)