2021 Conference Schedule

AUCCCD Leadership has been discussing the 2021 Conference at length over the last several months, keeping focus on current trends and listening to membership concerns. After careful discussion, we are planning to expand our 2021 hybrid offerings. Originally, we were planning to stream the Keynote Speakers (Dr. Robin DiAngelo & Dr. Anneliese Singh) and the Business Meetings; however, we are now working with breakout session presenters to offer 2 programs per each concurrent session via a live stream. In order to receive CE credit for these sessions, at home participants need to attend live. We will be sending out the full Hybrid Schedule on September 1, along with a link to register. Due to the additional cost of providing a hybrid option, the registration fee will remain the same as in-person, at $415.00.  

Times subject to change. Times are PST.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2021
9:00a - 4:00p AUCCCD Board Meeting - Board Members Only
3:00p - 6:00p Registration for Pre-Conference Open

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2021
7:00a - 6:00p Registration/Information Desk Open
8:00a - 9:00a Continental Breakfast for Preconference Attendees
8:00a - 10:30a IACS Board of Directors Meeting
8:30a - 4:00p Pre-Conference Workshops

  1. Full Day: Surviving and Thriving as a New Director: An Introductory Leadership Institute (An Elements of Excellence Program)
  2. Full Day: Serving Student Veterans and Service Members on Campus
  3. Morning Half Day: Assessing threat in clinical practice: Core concepts, risk management and ethical considerations
  4. Morning Half Day: Student Support Workshop: Considerations for Counseling Directors in Serving on and Partnering with BIT/CARE Teams
  5. Morning Half Day: Strategies in assessing risk for violence in university students
  6. Afternoon Half Day: Ethics for Civilian Providers of Student Veterans
  7. Afternoon Half Day: International Students in Transition: Culturally Sensitive Resilience Building and Coping in a Politically and Racially divided  Nation
  8. Afternoon Half Day: Self-care for University Counseling Ctr Directors as a response to Social Justice Demands: Self-preservation as an act of Political Warfare
  9. Afternoon Half Day: Case studies in assessing risk for violence in university students

9:00a - 4:00p AUCCCD Board Meeting – Board Members Only
10:30a - 1:00p IACS Board of Accreditation Meeting
11:30a - 1:00p Lunch Break (on your own)
4:30p - 6:00p New Directors’ and First Time Attendees Workshop - Learn More
5:00p - 6:30p IACS Wine and Cheese Reception
6:30p - 10:30p Opening Reception

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2021
7:00a - 6:00p Registration/Information Desk Open
7:00a - 8:30a Continental Breakfast 
7:00a - 5:00p Exhibits Open 
7:00a - 8:00a Worship Service
7:30a - 8:00a Meditation 
8:30a - 10:00a 1st Business Meeting
8:30a - 9:30a Partners’ Orientation
10:00a - 10:30a Break in Exhibit & Sponsor Hall
10:30a - 12:00p Keynote Speaker | Dr. Robin Di'Angelo
12:00p - 1:30p Multicultural Directors’ Luncheon
12:00p - 1:30p Directors from Catholic Schools Luncheon
1:30p - 3:00p Breakout Sessions
3:00p - 3:30p Break in Exhibit & Sponsor Hall
3:30p - 5:00p Affinity Groups
5:15p - 6:30p CCMH Meeting
6:30p Group Dinners (on your own)

MONDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2021
7:00a - 12:00p Registration/Information Desk Open 
7:00a - 8:30a Continental Breakfast
7:00a - 12:00p Exhibit & Sponsor Hall Open
7:00a - 8:00a Bob McGrath Annual Fun Run and Fun Walk
7:00a - 8:30a International Directors’ Interest Breakfast
7:30a - 8:00a Meditation
8:30a - 10:00a Breakout Sessions
10:00a - 10:30a Break in Exhibit & Sponsor Hall
10:30a - 12:00p Keynote Speaker | Dr. Anneliese Singh
12:30p - Open Afternoon or Scheduled Tours (pre-registration only)

6:30p Group Dinners (on your own)

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2021
7:00a - 8:30a Continental Breakfast
7:00a - 6:00p Registration/Information Desk Open
7:00a - 5:00p Exhibits
7:00a - 8:30a IACS Field Visitor Meeting
7:00a - 8:30a New Directors/First Time Attendees Informal Breakfast Meeting
7:00a - 8:15a Emeritus Directors’ Breakfast
7:30a - 8:00a Meditation
8:30a - 10:00a 2nd Business Meeting
10:00a - 10:30a Break in Exhibit & Sponsor Hall
10:30a - 12:00p Breakout Sessions
12:00p - 1:30p Women Directors' Lunch
1:30p - 3:00p Breakout Sessions
3:00p - 3:30p Break in Exhibit & Sponsor Hall
3:30p - 5:00p Breakout Sessions
6:30p - 10:30p Awards Program / Dinner 

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2021
Departures

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New Director, First Time Attendee Program (NDFTA)

The New Director/First Time Attendee (NDFTA) program aims to introduce new colleagues to all that AUCCCD has to offer and to foster connections with those of us who have more experience with the organization and our conferences. At the heart of the NDFTA program are the "conference connector" pairings, where we match our NDFTAs with more "seasoned directors" for a meet-up prior to the Saturday night opening reception. Our goal is for all interested NDFTAs to receive support in navigating the AUCCCD conference. As we can all remember from when we were newbies, attending AUCCCD for the first time can often feel overwhelming. Having a more experienced colleague make introductions to other directors and provide tips on how to make the most of the conference can really make a difference. NDFTA directors may sign up for this program complimentary during the registration process. 

Preconference Workshop Descriptions

Full Day, 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM

Surviving and Thriving as a New Director: An Introductory Leadership Institute
Cost: $75.00
Continuing Education: 6 Credit Hours

This full-day Introductory Leadership Institute is designed for directors in the early stages of their directorship (new to three years) and will address leadership development and management issues. The Institute is comprised of four modules: cultivating your style and values as a leader, understanding the multiple roles of directorship, a roundtable discussion on administrative issues (budget, personnel, stakeholders, and open questions), and a senior directors panel. The overall goals of the Introductory Leadership Institute are to provide an opportunity for directors in the early stages of their careers to develop supportive connections with their peers and to deepen their understanding of the skills involved in leading a College/University Counseling Center. 

Learning Objectives

  1. Explore various approaches to leadership in order to refine personal leadership styles and values.
  2. Analyze personal and professional dilemmas and complexities associated with leading a counseling center. 
  3. Identify and clarify the multiple roles that are associated with being a director.  

Presenters: Jeffrey Ng, Psychologist, Fordham University (15,001 - 20,000); Dianna Abel, Psychologist, Weber State University (25,001 - 30,000); ValaRay Irvin, , Psychologist, Southern University and A&M College (5,001 - 7,500); Warrenetta C. Mann, Psychologist, Wake Forest University (7,500 - 10,000)

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Full Day, 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM

Serving Student Veterans and Service Members on Campus
Cost: $75.00
Continuing Education: 6 Credit Hours

This full-day core competency program is designed to address cultural and clinical concerns of Veterans and Service members on a university or college campus. The morning begins with a review of military-specific events that can impact Service members and Veterans and their experiences as students, followed by a discussion of potential challenges to military connected students accessing services on campus. It engages participants to think about specific campus outreach activities and ways they can advocate for military connected students on campus. The second half of the workshop focuses on clinical issues on campus. Attendees will develop a better understanding of common social stressors for service-connected students and ways they can assist. Attendees also will be better able to identify common clinical presentations with which Service members and Veterans present to university counseling centers and ways that they can provide support  and effective, culturally-competent treatment. Clinical presentations discussed include post-traumatic stress disorder, sleep problems, depression, substance use disorders, chronic pain, suicide and traumatic brain injury. Included throughout is a focus on cultural competence specific to working with military connected clients that prepares the learner with a clearer understanding of how to engage with military connected students.

Learning Objectives

  1. Characterize deployment cycle stressors as they manifest in student Veterans and Service members.
  2. Develop recommendations designed to enhance student outreach opportunities specific to student Veterans and Service members to improve clinical and academic outcomes.
  3. Describe common clinical presentations of student Veterans and Service members in college and university counseling centers.

Presenters: Kevin Holloway, PhD - Clinical Psychology, Psychologist, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS), Center for Deployment Psychology (CDP) (Under 1,500); Jenna Ermold, PhD - Clinical Psychology, Psychologist, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS), Center for Deployment Psychology (CDP) (Under 1,500)

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Half Day, 8:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Assessing threat in clinical practice: Core concepts, risk management and ethical considerations
Cost: $40.00
Continuing Education: 3 Credit Hours

The majority of colleges and universities have developed behavioral intervention and/or threat assessment teams during the past decade to identify, assess and engage students who have exhibited disruptive and/or disturbing conduct on campus. These teams often recommend and/or refer students of concern to university counseling centers for assessment and treatment. And, increasingly, practitioners report that their caseloads already include clients who may pose a threat. Many practitioners report concerns about the ethical and risk management issues associated with this type of clinical work, including concerns about the need to practice within the bounds of their competency due to lack of formal training in threat assessment.  The presentation will review some of the core concepts in threat assessment literature that are most relevant to practitioners. The majority of the presentation will focus on ten key concepts in threat assessment that are particularly relevant to practitioners: grievances, aggrieved entitlement, injustice collecting, revenge fantasies, obsessive pursuit, violent extremism, identification, hidden arsenal, leakage and last resort statements. The presentation will include definitions of these concepts, case examples, risk management strategies for practitioners as well as references to the research literature for all ten concepts.

Learning Objectives

  1. Expand awareness of the history of violence on college and university campuses
  2. Develop an understanding of ten key concepts in the violence risk and threat assessment literatures and their relevance for clinical practice
  3. Identify key ethical issues relevant to threat assessment, including the requirement that mental health providers practice within the boundaries of their competency

Presenter: Greg Lambeth, PhD, Psychologist, University of Idaho (7,500 - 10,000)

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Half Day, 8:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Student Support Workshop: Considerations for Counseling Directors in Serving on and Partnering with BIT/CARE Teams
Cost: $40.00
Continuing Education: 3 Credit Hours

Behavioral Intervention Teams (BITs) and CARE Teams have evolved out of the Columbine, Virginia Tech and Northern Illinois University tragedies as a collaborative, multi-disciplinary response to students in early stages of distress. Teams are typically comprised of 7-10 staff, and should always include a mental health professional as nearly 75% of the cases discussed by BITs involve a psychological component as well as a behavioral issue. Given the challenges presented by nuanced cases such as behavioral health hospitalizations, concerning or disruptive behavior impacted by a mental health issue or other disability, or students requiring significant levels of care, counseling center directors are often left struggling to provide adequate connection to care while also assisting the college in responding to the student's behavior.   This session will provide a practical workshop for increasing counseling center directors' ability to serve collaboratively on the BIT or CARE Team in order to assist the college in responding to student behavior while also providing effective support and care to students. Presenters will provide an overview of BITs/CARE teams, define the role of the counselor on these teams and explore ethical issues, legal concerns, and lessons from recent cases related to treatment, ADA protections, and due process.

Learning Objectives:

  1. At the end of this pre-conference session, the attendee will be able to define the role of the counselor on the BIT/CARE team.
  2. At the end of this pre-conference session, the attendee will be able to participate in a collaborative, holistic way in responding to student mental health and behavioral issues.
  3. At the end of this pre-conference session, the attendee will be able to apply ethical and legal considerations to complicated cases involving both a student disciplinary and a mental health component

Presenters: Linda Abbott, Licensed Mental Health Counselor, Assistant Dean for Health and Wellness, Eckerd College (1,501 - 2,500); W. Scott Lewis, Doctor of Jurisprudence (JD)

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Half Day, 8:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Strategies in assessing risk for violence in university students
Cost: $40.00
Continuing Education: 3 Credit Hours

This workshop describes a process for the assessment of student risk for violence within the context of a university counseling center.  The workshop distinguishes between individual student "risk assessment" (the topic of the workshop) versus "threat assessment" procedures in universities.  The workshop details a step-by-step strategy for assessing student risk for violence.  The strategy reviewed emphasizes the many parallels between assessing "risk to others" and "risk to self," and integrates the use of clinical interviews, psychological testing, and collateral information in arriving at an assessment.  The potential risks and benefits in conducting such assessments are carefully reviewed.  This interactive and introductory workshop is meant for directors who are new to the topic.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Distinguish between individual student "risk assessment" versus "threat assessment."
  2. Describe parallels between the assessment of risk of suicide versus risk of violence.
  3. Analyze the risks and benefits of engaging in assessments for risk of violence.

Presenter: Steve Sprinkle, PhD, Psychologist,  (Emeritus)

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Half Day, 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Ethics for Civilian Providers of Student Veterans
Cost: $40.00
Continuing Education: 3 Credit Hours

Civilian mental healthcare providers working with military connected student service members and veterans often face ethical challenges unique to this population. Personal and professional ethical practice is contingent on effective application of personal and cultural morals, and professional regulations and expectations. Comprehensive understanding of informed consent, boundaries of cultural and clinical competence, disposition-driven diagnoses, multiple relationships, and professional fitness are all discussed in breadth and depth in the context of civilian practitioners working with military-connected clients. Decision-making models are presented to address ethical dilemmas, with specific discussion of the role of dual-relationships within a clinical framework. Extensive, complex vignettes are discussed in workshop/group format to ensure comprehensive, nuanced discussion.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Assess the definition of ethics and how it relates to the role of the mental health provider.
  2. Analyze five (5) ethical challenges common to mental health providers working with the military population.
  3. Apply knowledge of the ethical decision making process to military case examples.

Presenters: Elizabeth Parins, PsyD, Psychologist, Center for Deployment Psychology

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Half Day, 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Case studies in assessing risk for violence in university students
Cost: $40.00
Continuing Education: 3 Credit Hours

This workshop illustrates a strategy for assessing student risk for violence by reviewing actual case studies of students presenting with minimal, unclear, and significant risk for violence at a university counseling center.  The case studies range from students presenting at a counseling center for voluntary treatment to students undergoing a "mandated assessment" due to institutional concerns about their potential risk to others.  The case studies illustrate some of the benefits and drawbacks of engaging in assessments of risk for violence.  This interactive and intermediate workshop is meant for directors who already have some familiarity with the topic.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Analyze case studies as a means of learning to apply the steps involved in assessing risk for violence in university students.
  2. Describe parallels between the assessment of risk to self versus risk to others.
  3. Analyze the risks and benefits of engaging in assessments for risk of violence.

Presenter: Steve Sprinkle, PhD, Psychologist,  (Emeritus)

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Half Day, 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM

International Students in Transition: Culturally Sensitive Resilience Building and Coping in a Politically and Racially divided  Nation
Cost: $40.00
Continuing Education: 3 Credit Hours

This presentation provides a theoretical framework, practical strategies, and innovative practices for working with international students in transition in our current political and racially divided nation. International students are a growing population at universities in the United States, and the transition to study in a foreign country brings a unique set of challenges and opportunities. Potential challenges include adjustment problems and acculturative stress resulting from life changes in the acculturation process (Berry, 2006; Lin & Scherz, 2014). Research shows that International students may experience language and cultural barriers, academic and financial difficulties, interpersonal problems, racial discrimination, microaggression, loss of social support, alienation, and homesickness (Crockett & Hays, 2011; Lee and Rice, 2007; Yakunina, Weigold, & McCarthy, 2011). Cultural and language barriers may also impact students' experiences when engaging with professors and interacting with colleagues, thus limiting sources of support (Akanwa, 2015; Leong, 2015). Participants will come away with a culturally sensitive transition model for assisting international students within counselor education programs (Anderson, Goodman, & Schlossberg, 2012). An international student panel will be a part of this presentation, with doctoral and master's students sharing personal applications of the model, and discussing issues unique to their diverse experiences and backgrounds.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will increase their knowledge about issues facing international students.
  2. Participants will apply transition theory and its applications to the psychological and emotional toll political and racial uprising have on international students through their lens.
  3. Participants will identify practical strategies to increase resilience and coping and utilize culturally sensitive interventions when working with international students in counseling centers.

Presenter: Damon Chambers, Counselor Education and Supervision, Counselor, Walden University (5,001 - 7,500)

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Half Day, 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Self-care for University Counseling Ctr Directors as a response to Social Justice Demands: Self-preservation as an act of Political Warfare
Cost: $40.00
Continuing Education: 3 Credit Hours

The video-taped murder of Mr. George Floyd, Jr. by police officers aired multiple times on television; it was viewed millions of times on YouTube and likely contributed to acute stress (Holman et al, 2014; Karmer et al, 2014). The 2020 election also fueled a variety of intense feelings that left families and friends polarized. Language blaming a race of people for the health pandemic further contributed to increased aggression against Asians. Many people are grieving the death of millions due to Covid-19 or are impacted by long-term mental health issues as a result of contracting the virus. Recent voting rights legislation advanced in states where there is a high voter turnout of minorities also heightens social justice concerns. These ongoing assaults which adversely impact minorities challenge counseling center directors to manage and hire staff and design responsive programs while dealing with personal reactions to the pandemics of health and racism (Kerig, 2019).  The purpose of this program is to recognize the multiple stressors experienced by university and college counseling center directors and the value of creating a personal self-care plan to prevent burnout. This program will also include an experiential component of sharing reactions to the multiple pandemics.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will review methods of assessing their level of self-care.
  2. Participants will identify warning signs of emotional and physical fatigue that impact their professional work.
  3. Participants will create a personal self-care plan.

Presenters: Denise Hayes, Ph.D., Psychologist, Indiana University Bloomington (35,001 - 45,000); Yolanda Bogan, Ph.D., Psychologist, Florida A & M (Emerita)

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KEYNOTE ADDRESS:

Keynote Speaker | Dr. Robin DiAngelo
Sunday, October 10 | 10:30 AM – 12:00 PM PST

Dr. DiAngelo is an Affiliate Associate Professor of Education at the University of Washington, Seattle. In addition, she holds two Honorary Doctoral Degrees. She is a two-time winner of the Student’s Choice Award for Educator of the Year at the University of Washington’s School of Social Work. Dr. DiAngelo has numerous publications and books on social and racial justice. In 2011 she coined the term White Fragility in an academic article which influenced the international dialogue on race. Her book, White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard For White People To Talk About Racism, was released in June of 2018 and debuted on the New York Times Bestseller List where it remains and has been translated into 10 languages. Her newest book, Nice Racism: How Progressive White People Perpetuate Racial Harm picks up where White Fragility left off and dives deeper into the conversation. She has been a consultant, educator, and facilitator for over 20 years on issues of racial and social justice, working with a wide range of organizations including private, non-profit, and governmental.

White Fragility

In this talk, race and social justice educator Robin DiAngelo helps audiences understand the dynamics of White Fragility, how we come to engage in them, and how we can move beyond them. Based on her #1 New York Times bestselling book White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism, Dr. DiAngelo helps audiences and organizations develop an antiracist framework based on education, self-awareness, and engaged practice.


 

KEYNOTE ADDRESS:

Keynote Speaker | Dr. Anneliese Singh
Monday, October 11 | 10:30 AM – 12:00 PM PST

Anneliese Singh, PhD, LPC (she/they) is a Professor and Associate Provost for Diversity and Faculty Development and Diversity/Chief Diversity Officer at Tulane University. Anneliese engages in NIH-funded longitudinal research with trans and nonbinary people exploring their experiences of resilience, trauma, and identity development, with a focus on young people and BIPOC people. She is Past-President of APA's Division 17 and ACA's LGBTQ+ and Southern divisions where her presidential initiatives focused on developing a counseling psychology of liberation, implementing structures to address anti-Black racism and facilitate liberatory learning environments for trans and nonbinary communities. Anneliese is the author of The Racial Healing Handbook: Practical Activities to Help You Challenge Privilege, Confront Systemic Racism, and Engage in Collective Healing and The Queer and Trans Resilience Workbook. She has written extensively on multicultural, social justice, and liberatory approaches to counseling. Dr. Singh is @anneliesesingh on Twitter and Instagram. Anneliese is guided by Audre Lorde's reminder that "Without community, there is no liberation" and Dr. King's vision of the beloved community.

Building the Beloved Community in Our Counseling Centers: Living and Practicing Liberation with One Another Everyday

In this session, Anneliese reviews the history of multiculturalism and social justice within counseling center settings to identify the barriers to integrating everyday liberation practices. Attendees will be invited into deep self-reflection on their own journeys towards liberation and freedom - and how to uplift these journeys to change policies and procedures that create barriers for racial healing and healing from other interlocking privileges and oppressions in their personal and professional communities.


 

Monday Afternoon Tours

For those who have never attended the conference before, we typically offer a free afternoon on the Monday of the conference. This allows for your own personal time to explore the city, however we also offer 3 organized tours. The three options for the 2021 Conference are:

Option 1: Discovery Park -- $50.00

Registration fee includes round trip transportation and boxed lunch. 
Approximate time: 12:30 - 4:30 PM

Discovery Park is a 534 acre natural area park operated by the Seattle Parks and Recreation. It is the largest city park in Seattle, and occupies most of the former Fort Lawton site. The site is one of breathtaking majesty. Situated on Magnolia Bluff overlooking Puget Sound, Discovery Park offers spectacular view of both the Cascade and the Olympic Mountain ranges. The secluded site includes two miles of protected tidal beaches as well as open meadow lands, dramatic sea cliffs, forest groves, active sand dunes, thickets and streams. The role of Discovery Park is to provide an open space of quiet and tranquility away from the stress and activity of the city, a sanctuary for wildlife, as well as an outdoor classroom for people to learn about the natural world. Maintained in its semi-natural condition the park will continue to offer a biologically rich and diverse natural area for urban dwellers and an unmatched opportunity for environmental education. DOWNLOAD THE MAP

Option 2: Bainbridge Island -- $40.00
Registration fee includes round trip transportation and Ferry ticket. Meals and attractions are on your own given the number of things to do on the island.

Bainbridge Island is a small city in western Washington state. It’s connected to Seattle by ferry over the open waters of Puget Sound. The trip from Seattle to Bainbridge Island via ferry boat (locals refer to it merely as “the boat”) is 35 minutes. Once on the island, the forested Bloedel Reserve has landscaped gardens and trails. Nearby, coastal Fay Bainbridge Park and Campground features an east-facing beach with views of the Cascade Mountains and Puget Sound. Bainbridge Island Museum of Art, in an eco-friendly building, offers rotating exhibitions by contemporary local artists. Other attractions include:

Option 3: Seattle Center -- $75.00
Registration fee includes round trip transportation and Admission to the Space Needle + Chihuly Garden and Glass. Lunch is on your own given the number of restaurants and food courts in the area.

Seattle Center is home to the Space Needle, Chihuly Garden and GlassPacific Science CenterMuseum of Pop CultureThe Children’s Museum, and a host of theatrical and cultural experiences.  DOWNLOAD THE MAP

The Seattle Center Sculpture Walk will also be occurring during this time and is a free event.

Restaurants / Food Court Options (On your own)

  • Chihuly Garden Art Plaza
  • Armory Food & Event HallSeattle Center offers an amazing variety of delicious food choices for your dining experience. From local and national food merchants inside the Armory Food & Event Hall to restaurants at attractions across campus, you’re sure to find breakfast, lunch, dinner and dessert options to satisfy your appetite.

Thank you to our 2021 Conference Sponsors!

For information regarding the 2021 Annual AUCCCD Conference in Seattle, WA, please view our Sponsorship Packages or contact the AUCCCD Office - [email protected].

DIAMOND SPONSORS

                                                  

SILVER SPONSORS

                     

BRONZE SPONSORS

                                                                                                                                                                                    

GIVEAWAY SPONSORS

          

 LIAISON PARTNERS

                                                 


 Questions? Contact the AUCCCD Office.